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Amark Group has re-branded. Watch this video to find out more!

Christmas Trading Hours

Thursday 21st - 6am - 5.30pm - Normal Trading Hours

Friday 22nd - Closed for Stocktake

Saturday 23rd - Closed

Monday 25th - Christmas Day Holiday

Tuesday 26th - Boxing Day Holiday

Wednesday 27th - Closed

Thursday 28th - Closed

Friday 29th - Closed

Saturday 30th - Closed

Monday 1st January - New Years Day Holiday

Tuesday 2nd - 6am - 5.30pm - Normal Trading Hours

Management and Staff of Tilers & Trade Shop would like to thank you for your continued support.  Merry Christmas and a safe and prosperous New Year.

 

Laticrete Tips for Working in Hot Weather

Things are about to heat up here in Australia, so make sure you are prepared by reading these helpful hints and tips for tiling in hot weather.

You want to ensure the best installation of your projects over the hotter months, and there is a simple rule to follow when an installation is subjected to high temperatures: The 8ºC Rule – for every 8ºC above 21ºC, Portland cement and epoxy based materials take half as long to cure.

General tips for working in Hot Temperatures:

  1. For best results, always ship and store installation materials at 5ºC - 32ºC to extend the shelf life and working time. Do not store products in direct sunlight. If installation materials are too warm, they should be cooled to the specified temperature range for that specific product.
  2. Dampen or wet down substrate surfaces to not only clean the area, but to lower the temperature and lower the absorption rate of the substrate. Sweep off excess water just before mortar is applied. This step will extend the working time of the installation materials.
  3. Stir latex additives thoroughly before mixing with thin-sets, grouts, plasters, stuccos and other Portland cement mortars.
  4. Due to the rapid rate of moisture loss and Portland cement dehydration at temperatures >32ºC, cover installations with polyethylene sheeting for 1-2 days to allow curing at a more normal rate.
  5. Low humidity also accelerates the curing process.
  6. Tent off or provide shade when working in direct sunlight.
  7. Work during cooler periods of the day (e.g. early morning)

Tips for Grouting in Hot Temperatures:

  1. Store grouting materials at 5ºC - 32ºC to extend the shelf life, pot life and working time. Do not store products in direct sunlight. If installation materials are too warm, they should be cooled to the specified temperature range for that specific product 24 hours prior to the start of grouting.
  2. Dampen or wet down substrate surfaces to not only clean the area, but to lower the temperature and lower the absorption rate of the substrate.
  3. Always clean the mixing pail before mixing a fresh batch of grout. Left over grout in the pail (on bottom and sides) can accelerate the setting of freshly mixed grout.
  4. Mix cement grouts with clean cool water. This step will extend the pot life and open time of cement grouts.
  5. Remix cement grouts after ~15 to 20 minutes (after initial mixing, 5 minutes of slaking / remix and use) to an even consistency to prolong pot life.
  6. Tent off areas of work to provide shade when working in direct sunlight.
  7. Work during cooler periods of the day (e.g. early morning).

Laticrete Tips for Working in Hot Weather

Things are about to heat up here in Australia, so make sure you are prepared by reading these helpful hints and tips for tiling in hot weather.

You want to ensure the best installation of your projects over the hotter months, and there is a simple rule to follow when an installation is subjected to high temperatures: The 8ºC Rule – for every 8ºC above 21ºC, Portland cement and epoxy based materials take half as long to cure.

General tips for working in Hot Temperatures:

  1. For best results, always ship and store installation materials at 5ºC - 32ºC to extend the shelf life and working time. Do not store products in direct sunlight. If installation materials are too warm, they should be cooled to the specified temperature range for that specific product.
  2. Dampen or wet down substrate surfaces to not only clean the area, but to lower the temperature and lower the absorption rate of the substrate. Sweep off excess water just before mortar is applied. This step will extend the working time of the installation materials.
  3. Stir latex additives thoroughly before mixing with thin-sets, grouts, plasters, stuccos and other Portland cement mortars.
  4. Due to the rapid rate of moisture loss and Portland cement dehydration at temperatures >32ºC, cover installations with polyethylene sheeting for 1-2 days to allow curing at a more normal rate.
  5. Low humidity also accelerates the curing process.
  6. Tent off or provide shade when working in direct sunlight.
  7. Work during cooler periods of the day (e.g. early morning)

Tips for Grouting in Hot Temperatures:

  1. Store grouting materials at 5ºC - 32ºC to extend the shelf life, pot life and working time. Do not store products in direct sunlight. If installation materials are too warm, they should be cooled to the specified temperature range for that specific product 24 hours prior to the start of grouting.
  2. Dampen or wet down substrate surfaces to not only clean the area, but to lower the temperature and lower the absorption rate of the substrate.
  3. Always clean the mixing pail before mixing a fresh batch of grout. Left over grout in the pail (on bottom and sides) can accelerate the setting of freshly mixed grout.
  4. Mix cement grouts with clean cool water. This step will extend the pot life and open time of cement grouts.
  5. Remix cement grouts after ~15 to 20 minutes (after initial mixing, 5 minutes of slaking / remix and use) to an even consistency to prolong pot life.
  6. Tent off areas of work to provide shade when working in direct sunlight.
  7. Work during cooler periods of the day (e.g. early morning).

Laticrete Tips for Hot Weather Tiling and Grouting

Building Industry Fairness (Security of Payment) Bill 2017

Queensland has ushered in a new era of ‘fairness’ in the building sector as the government in that state introduces legislation designed to improve protection for subcontractors.

Introduced into Parliament, the Building Industry Fairness (Security of Payment) Bill 2017 aims to improve security of payment laws, modernise and simplify provisions for making subcontractor charges, improve ease of access to security of payment legislation and provide for greater accountability.

A critical part of the policy revolves around the introduction of project bank accounts (PBAs) - trust accounts into which progress payments and retention monies are held in trust, independent of the head contractor and principal.

These will be mandated under a two-stage process with PBAs becoming mandatory on all government building projects valued at between $1 million and $10 million between from 1 January next year and on all building projects over $1 million (public or private) from 1 January 2019.

In a setback for subcontractors, however, the rules apply only to building projects. Civil or engineering projects such as roads, ports or mines are not covered, and contractors/subcontractors on these projects will not enjoy PBA protection.

Also, the Bill applies to first tier subcontractors only - those who deal directly with the head contractor.

Whilst the Bill enables the protection available through PBAs to lower tier sub-contractors (e.g. sub-subcontractors) later, no protection will be applied for these sub-contractors at this point.

The Bill also aims to further prevent phoenix activity within the industry by clamping down on ‘shadow directors’ - those who have been banned from running construction companies in Queensland but effectively control companies from behind the scenes (such as through their spouse being a director).

Amendments to the Queensland Building and Construction Commission Act will ensure that the current definition of an ‘influential person’ is expanded to ensure that a person’s function is captured in addition to their formal role.

Other elements of the legislation will overhaul provisions for progress payment claims, improve the usability of subcontractor charge provisions and increase penalties for unlicensed work.

In its explanatory memorandum, the Government said problems in respect of late or non-payments had been identified through two years of consultation.

“What was once considered poor business practice has become a standard operating model for some licensees in the industry - higher contractors often do not make, or delay payments to subcontractors to supplement cash flow, offset the costs of other projects or to receive interest, and avoid additional financing costs for accessing further funding,” the memorandum states.

Minister for Housing and Public Works Mick de Brenni said the changes will help to ensure fair practices within the building sector.

“For too long the building and construction industry has operated by pushing most the risk for projects onto subcontractors - often family run businesses,” de Brenni said.

“That changes with these new laws. We are putting the construction industry on the level.”

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